NCAA.org - The Official Site of the NCAA - Life After the Game http://www.uqiqfo.live/themes-topics/life-after-game Everything you need to know to master the post-college transition. Return to After the Game en 6 tips for establishing a personal board of directors http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/6-tips-establishing-personal-board-directors <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img title="iStock Image" style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/Oct2019ATG_PersonalBODTeaser.jpg" width="1600" height="900" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>Who are people who can provide you insight into your career field? Who are people who can help guide you through life?</p> <p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--headshot float-right"><img style="" class="media-element file-headshot" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/headshot/public/Oct2019ATG_CharlesSmallHS.jpg?itok=Mdqh6-py" alt="" /><figcaption class="field-item field field-name-field-description-caption field-type-text-long field-label-hidden even" style="max-width: 150px;">Charles Small</figcaption></figure></p> <p>These are just a few questions Charles Small has asked himself over the years in preparation for building what he calls “a personal board of directors.” As a men’s basketball student-athlete at Pittsburgh (2003-06), he began forming a board of directors who serve as mentors in different areas of his life.</p> <p>These four to five evolving mentors have provided trusted judgment throughout his career. His board of directors ranges from former Pitt Interim Athletics Director Donna Sanft, who gave him his first internship in the compliance office, to his undergraduate professor Rob Ruck, who years later served on his dissertation committee.</p> <p>Small, now senior associate athletic director for student services at Iowa State, offers tips on how student-athletes can form their own personal board of directors:</p> <h3>Clarify Yourself</h3> <p>Before you begin considering potential mentors, you need to have clarity about who you are, including your values, interests and strengths. As a student-athlete, you developed your identity in terms of athletics, but you also developed other aspects of your life, such as your academic life, career interests and relationships. “The first piece is having some clarification on what your values are and try to find people that have similar values you have,” Small says. “Having clarification of who you are, I think, leads toward what you want to do.”</p> <h3>Be Intentional</h3> <p>In order to build out your support network, you need to be intentional in identifying people, but you also need to be intentional in developing the actual relationship. When you reach out to potential mentors and ask for their time, you need to have a clear understanding what exactly you’re seeking from them. Are you asking them to share their career path, or are you asking them to hold you accountable for the next steps in terms of your own strategy? “Think about being transparent with people about what you’re looking for in a relationship, and that it’s a two-way street,” Small says.</p> <h3>Use Your Resources</h3> <p>Leverage the natural connections you have with people. Depending on the setting, think to yourself, “What do we have in common?” An easy one, Small says, is if you find someone who is a fellow alum at your alma mater. “I think a great resource is the alumni at your institution,” he says. “You automatically have that connection. That’s an automatic conversation starter.” Former student-athletes, especially those who played the same sport as you, are another great resource.</p> <h3>Listen</h3> <p>Once you form connections, be inquisitive about people’s career paths and life. “I think the easiest thing to do is ask someone, ‘Hey! Do you have 30 minutes for a phone call? I just want to hear your story,’” Small says. “People often are willing to share their story because it doesn’t take a lot of prep. People like talking about themselves. It’s kind of natural.”</p> <p>When you’re speaking with a potential mentor, take notes. What helped them be successful? What are touch points you can talk about down the road? Maybe it’s sending them a handwritten note congratulating them on an award, an article written about them or filling them in about your conference championship.</p> <h3>Focus on Quality Over Quantity</h3> <p>Seek genuine relationships rather than building a long list of people with whom you “touched base” or met for coffee once. “I’d rather build a relationship and have that build over time with a couple people and have quality relationships … versus having all these people on LinkedIn, but it’s no substance,” Small says.</p> <h3>Give Yourself Time</h3> <p>Building meaningful relationships takes time. “That’s the hard part in our society — that a lot of times we want to do things instantaneously, we want it right away,” Small says. But the reality is, you can’t rush it. “To me, it’s really important to start that practice even when we’re in school. … It’s never too early to start building those relationships.”</p> <h3>About the Expert</h3> <p><em>Charles Small is the senior associate athletics director for student services at Iowa State. He earned all three of his degrees from Pittsburgh: a Bachelor of Arts in social work (2006), Master of Social Work (2007) and a Doctor of Education (2013). He was a three-year letter winner on the Pittsburgh basketball team (2003-06). Small oversees academic services, student-athlete engagement, sports medicine and Olympic sports strength and conditioning at Iowa State. He is in his first season as sports administrator for men’s basketball and wrestling. Small is a member of the department’s senior staff and is the school’s Deputy Title IX coordinator.</em></p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/after-game" class="tags__link">After the Game</a></li></ul> Tue, 01 Oct 2019 17:29:36 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 27946 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/6-tips-establishing-personal-board-directors#comments Why this former student-athlete works out with 100 people in one year http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/why-former-student-athlete-works-out-100-people-one-year <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/Oct2018ATG_CrystalHo-DaveMaloney.jpg" width="1600" height="900" alt="" /><figcaption class="field-item field field-name-field-description-caption field-type-text-long field-label-hidden even">In June, Crystal Ho, senior vice president at Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management, worked out with Dave Maloney at her gym, Rumble Boxing, in New York City.</figcaption></figure></p> <p>One hundred workouts with 100 people every year, never counting more than one workout partner at a time or the same person twice. It’s a massive goal to attain in 365 days, but one that Dave Maloney is on pace to achieve for the third straight year.</p> <p>His personal workout challenge does more than keep him fit and motivated. As a former Auburn runner and founder of a national athletic tour that raises money for pediatric cancer research, Maloney is maximizing his networking opportunities in a space few others do: the gym.</p> <p>In 2016, when Maloney and his nine-person staff moved into a new office in Houston, he had a quote most often attributed to Plato stenciled on the entry wall to inspire him and his team daily: “You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than a year of conversation.”</p> <p>And discover, he has. Maloney has learned that breaking a sweat with a new acquaintance can quickly break down barriers. Being empathetic and confident enough to show vulnerability, while supporting another in being vulnerable, has helped him form hundreds of new relationships.</p> <p>“My business goal is to meet people in settings and in activities that are natural for athletes,” Maloney says. “There is an honesty derived in those moments that’s undeniable, and the relationship is far more transparent from the start.”?</p> <p>Maloney taps into the NCAA After the Game LinkedIn group and other sources to find and connect with new business professionals each year. “With a high degree of accuracy,” he says, “you can figure out whether that person cares about exercise.”</p> <p>Maloney shares his background, that he’s an athlete and has a business objective he’d like to pursue with them. “Could we meet for a workout?” he asks.</p> <p>The answer, Maloney says, is almost always yes.</p> <p>“When you replace the steak dinner, golf outing or happy hour with a request to work out with them, the ask itself distinguishes you,” he says. “And you further distinguish yourself in these shared experiences by meeting them where they are already going to be — in his or her gym.”</p> <p>For Maloney and his workout partners, activities have ranged from traditional endurance sports, such as cycling, rowing and running, to CrossFit and other strength and cardio workouts. Most often, these take place in the executive’s local, preferred fitness venue. Other times, Maloney coordinates a workout on the road in a city where the two are scheduled to be at the same time.?</p> <p>After the workout, Maloney leverages the new relationship by asking who else his workout partner can introduce him to. “It’s the easiest introduction someone is willing to make on my behalf,” he says.?</p> <p>Maloney reports that his relationships grow exponentially beyond those initial meetups. For instance, a successful media entrepreneur he worked out with is now someone he regularly turns to for insights and advice. “It’s a real business advantage for me,” Maloney says.</p> <p>As college athletes transition out of sport and into the workplace, Maloney suggests they make the most of their athletic backgrounds. “It’s part of your personal story, and it gives you a home-court advantage in making personal connections with busy executives and industry influencers who are predisposed to working out.”</p> <p>Capitalizing on that advantage is easy to do in the gym.</p> <p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--headshot float-left"><img style="" class="media-element file-headshot" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/headshot/public/Oct2018ATG_Maloney-hs.jpg?itok=KPwdOIhA" alt="" /><figcaption class="field-item field field-name-field-description-caption field-type-text-long field-label-hidden even" style="max-width: 150px;">Dave Maloney</figcaption></figure></p> <p><em>Dave Maloney is founder and executive producer of The D10, a nationally televised athletic competition produced for amateur athletes who compete while raising funds supporting multiple pediatric oncology research centers directed by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.?Decathletes compete in a mix of 10 events traditionally performed in the Olympic decathlon and NFL Scouting Combine.?Maloney, previously featured on <a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/dave-maloney-wall-street-s-weekend-warrior">NCAA After the Game</a>, earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Auburn while competing in cross country and track and field.?</em></p> <div class="inline-sidebar-full"> <h4>Behind the story</h4> <h5>Becoming workout partner No. 84</h5> <div style="font-size:.8125em; font-weight:400;">By Monica Miller</div> <p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--three_by_four_hundred float-left"><img style="" class="media-element file-three-by-four-hundred" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/three_by_four_hundred/public/Oct2018ATG_Maloney-Miller.jpg?itok=h5iqaMv7" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>When I interviewed Dave Maloney by phone, the exchange was about as friendly as a writer could hope. We had never met in person before, but that was inconsequential as Maloney turned the tables by asking me, the interviewer, the final question.</p> <p>If I am ever in your city, he asked, would you want to do a workout together?</p> <p>“Sure, that would be fun,” I replied. But as sincere as his offer was, I thought the likelihood of that happening was low.</p> <p>Then, just weeks later, a business trip took me to Houston —?where Maloney lives and works.</p> <p>I never thought I’d play a part in personally helping the business executive and former Auburn runner achieve his goal of 100 workouts with 100 people in a year. But there it was, a chance to do just that while in Houston.</p> <p>We met at Equinox River Oaks, Maloney’s gym near his D10 office. Barefoot and ready to stretch it out, we shared a quick hug and joined in a 60-minute yoga class over the lunch hour.</p> <p>It’s interesting when you meet someone in person whom you’ve only known on the phone. Normally, the interaction starts with dialogue. But this was refreshingly different.</p> <p>We worked through the prescribed yoga moves side by side. Sixty minutes. No talk. Just sharing the space, this new space, together.</p> <p>Only after, as we were lacing up our shoes to head back into our busy lives, did we catch up with one another through conversation.</p> <p>“What NCAA After the Game business do you have in Houston?” he asked.</p> <p>“How did your D10 competition last week in San Francisco go?” I inquired.</p> <p>Just before we parted, I asked Maloney where this workout fell in his goal for 100 workout partners this year.</p> <p>“Eighty-four,” he responded.</p> <p>I am his workout partner No. 84, and no one could be more surprised than me.</p> </div> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d1" class="tags__link">Division I</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/mens-cross-country" class="tags__link">Men&#039;s Cross Country</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/mens-outdoor-track-field" class="tags__link">Men&#039;s Outdoor Track &amp; Field</a></li></ul> Wed, 17 Oct 2018 17:10:17 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 24436 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/why-former-student-athlete-works-out-100-people-one-year#comments 5 ways to maintain your nutrition game http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/5-ways-maintain-your-nutrition-game <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/ATG Nutrition.jpeg" width="1200" height="801" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>As college athletes, you were accustomed to preparation, whether it was for the big test or the next competition. But when your college career comes to an end, along with your regular access to dining halls and team meals, it’s easy to overlook the importance of having a post-graduation game plan for good nutrition. We asked Lauren Link, a registered dietitian who oversees sports nutrition for Purdue athletics, to provide her best healthy eating tips for this transition period.</p> <p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--headshot float-left"><img style="" class="media-element file-headshot" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/headshot/public/Lauren Link _0.JPG?itok=ajxh56ND" alt="" /><figcaption class="field-item field field-name-field-description-caption field-type-text-long field-label-hidden even" style="max-width: 150px;">Lauren Link</figcaption></figure></p> <p><strong>1. Adjust your caloric intake. </strong>Most former athletes burn only 500 to 1,000 calories per day from activity, which is less than they did as a student-athlete. “Even if you stay active and have a workout regime after college, it’s unlikely that you are going to be burning as many calories as before,” Link says. Dietary changes are one way — a big way — to bridge the post-college calorie gap.</p> <p>Carbohydrate intake is an area to pay attention to. Instead of carbs such as grains and starchy vegetables taking up one-third to half of your plate when you were in full training mode, Link recommends about a fourth of a former athlete’s plate be filled with carb-rich foods. Think of carbs like pasta as a side item now, not the main course.</p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <p><strong>Meal planning for the young professional in 3 easy steps </strong></p> <ol><li>Buy a crockpot.</li> <li>Add four fresh or frozen chicken breasts and let it slow-cook all day.</li> <li>Use the shredded chicken for a variety of easy-to-prepare future meals, like chicken tacos, chicken wraps and barbeque chicken.</li> </ol></div> <p><strong>2. Just like your momma said, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. </strong>It’s not only a healthy choice, Link says, but filling yourself up with fruits and veggies comes without the negative caloric impact found in many other food items. With meal planning in mind, go to the grocery every week or two so that you can purchase fresh produce, dairy and grains — consumables that won’t last a month in your pantry or refrigerator. Empty caloric foods such as fried foods, cakes, cookies and candy don’t do much for you, so limit your intake, she says.</p> <p><strong>3. It’s your kitchen now, be the cook.</strong> A detailed meal plan might seem intimidating to young professionals, but it starts with the basics. Choose one or two nights per week to prepare meals at home. It doesn’t have to be fancy. Even if it’s just you, cook a quantity large enough to pack for your lunch for the next day. Batch cooking not only ensures that you’ll be eating healthy meals that you prepared, but you’ll be dining out less, which can really rack up the calories — and the dollars.</p> <p>“Cooking ahead is a huge money saver that I see all the time among young grads who played college sports,” says Link. Starting out, they feel like they have a lot of money. Tuition bills are in the past and their careers are now underway. But a daily $7 to $10 lunch out with co-workers can add up to a couple of hundred bucks per month, and without realizing it, you can spend a couple of thousand dollars in a year just on lunch. A little bit of meal prepping and planning can go a long way for your wallet.</p> <p><strong>4. You didn’t skip practice, so don’t skip meals.</strong> You may be running late for a meeting or traveling for work and think you don’t have time for breakfast or lunch. Those meals get abused a lot, Link says. Skipping meals throws off the body’s metabolism, increases the risk of muscle breakdown, and can add fat mass. If you do skip a meal, the next time you eat, the body’s insulin response is higher, which promotes the storage of fat. It also leaves you hungry, which leads to being irritable. Eating three meals a day may just make you a more productive employee, given you are not cranky from missing meals.</p> <p><strong>5. If you drink alcohol, have an intake plan. </strong>Most college graduates are over 21 and, like a lot of young professionals, many enjoy the social scene out with friends and former teammates. There is nothing wrong with a beer or a glass of wine, Link says, but doing so multiple times a week, or to excess, really adds on the calories over the course of a week or month. A good plan is to limit yourself to a day or two per week to consume an alcoholic beverage. If you drink, be choosy about the mixers used. Avoid sodas and juices and opt for lower caloric mixers such as water, tonic water or club soda.</p> <p><strong>About the Expert</strong></p> <p><em>Lauren Link is a registered dietitian and board-certified specialist in sports dietetics. She earned a bachelor's degree from Purdue with a double major in dietetics and in nutrition, fitness and health, and she competed on the Boilermakers’ women’s soccer team. As director of sports nutrition at her alma mater, Link promotes optimal performance during student-athletes’ sports careers and is passionate about helping them successfully transition into the post-college athletics world. She is spearheading a transitional program called BLAST (Boiler Life After SporT) and is the author of “From Athlete to Normal Human.”</em></p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li></ul> Wed, 17 Jan 2018 17:31:24 +0000 rpowell 21971 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/5-ways-maintain-your-nutrition-game#comments Why your life after college sports starts with reflection http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/why-your-life-after-college-sports-starts-reflection <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/MelindaHarrison2.jpeg" width="4752" height="3168" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>After you play your last college game, many relationships, including the one you have with yourself, are about to radically change.</p> <p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--headshot float-left"><img style="" class="media-element file-headshot" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/headshot/public/MelindaHarrison.jpg?itok=pZ2l49QI&amp;c=bebc2364c0d065f0c8cfd2eef0f619d0" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>On campus, you had deep bonds with people who helped you develop your game. Teammates had your back. Coaches pushed you forward. Team physicians and trainers kept you healthy. Academic leaders supported your learning.</p> <p>The focus that was once on you is now directed at others: the college athletes who are still competing.</p> <p>Facing unfamiliar territory can be daunting, but the skills developed as a student-athlete are transferable and will help you successfully transition to life after sport. Awareness is a first step in finding your new “team.”</p> <p>As your role shifts and the base of your core social fabric is dramatically altered, take time to think about your “new life.” Ask yourself: In what areas are you feeling the most significant changes?</p> <p>Consider some of the areas below that have been imbedded in your old routine that are no longer the same:</p> <ul><li>Day-to-day campus routines and responsibilities that kept you occupied.</li> <li>The commitment and self-regulation that came with being a student-athlete.</li> <li>The feeling of being connected to a team.</li> <li>Knowing you had a trusted advisor to talk to.</li> <li>Required athletic training.</li> </ul><p>Reflecting and journaling on how you are approaching these areas of change helps. How have these things changed? What continues in a different form or a new version of what you had in college? Where can new relationships fit in?</p> <p>Being self-aware by itself does not eliminate your feelings associated with these changes, but it’s a starting place — an understanding of what is different, and an opportunity for choice on how to approach it moving forward.</p> <p>As with most things in life, when something ends — such as your student-athlete career — there is an opportunity for something else to begin. Acceptance and awareness of these changes, and deciding what skills you can take with you, will help accelerate your development toward your next success.</p> <p><strong>About the Expert</strong></p> <p><em>Melinda Harrison is a founding partner of Teal &amp; Co. — a consulting firm based in Toronto that helps individuals flourish through positive transitions and organizations be successful in developing and retaining top talent. Harrison, an NCAA multi-event, multiyear All-American swimmer and team captain, earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Michigan. She competed on the Canadian Olympic swim team in 1984 and is a 2006 Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor inductee.</em></p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-swimming-diving" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Swimming &amp; Diving</a></li></ul> Tue, 16 Jan 2018 17:17:37 +0000 rpowell 21906 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/why-your-life-after-college-sports-starts-reflection#comments Stephanie Ferri-Lewis: 3 attributes learned from college sports http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/stephanie-ferri-lewis-3-attributes-learned-college-sports <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img alt="Stephanie Ferri-Lewis" style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/field/image/fsa-story-2.jpeg" width="2000" height="1125" /></figure></p> <p>Stephanie Ferri-Lewis took on a task most undergrads wouldn’t even consider — competing in swimming, cross country and soccer, all while being a full-time student preparing for medical school at Pfeiffer. Hard work and tenacity opened doors for her.</p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <h4>Biography</h4> <p><strong>Stephanie Ferri-Lewis</strong><br /> Physician, St. John’s Emergency Trauma Center</p> <p><strong>Hometown:</strong> Cape Coral, Florida</p> <p><strong>Current city:</strong> Springfield, Missouri</p> <p><strong>School:</strong> Bachelor’s degree in biology, <a href="http://www.pfeiffer.edu/">Pfeiffer</a>, 1994; M.D., Ross University School of Medicine</p> <p><strong>Sports:</strong> Cross country, soccer, swimming</p> <p><strong>Interesting fact:</strong> As a former scuba diver, she has gone into frozen lakes on body and evidence dives for the sheriff’s department.</p> </div> <p>Now an emergency department physician at a Level I trauma center in Springfield, Missouri, Ferri-Lewis often calls on lessons she learned as a student-athlete.? Every day is a challenge balancing being a physician, a wife and a mom, but these skills honed as a student-athlete help her excel:</p> <h3>Determination</h3> <p>As a three-sport athlete at Pfeiffer preparing for medical school, Ferri-Lewis pushed herself athletically and academically. And because of it, tough obstacles now seem more manageable, she said. “When a day at the hospital is particularly challenging, either physically or mentally, I take on a ‘we can get it done’ attitude. The emergency department is a place where you don’t want someone to just give up if things get difficult, and my determination makes me well-suited for this specialty.”</p> <h3>Mental composure</h3> <p>Despite a busy schedule of overlapping athletic seasons and a rigorous academic program with visions of medical school, Ferri-Lewis never let stress get to her in college. Years later, that composure is a critical component of her work. “When a high-level trauma patient comes in and people’s lives are on the line, keeping a room full of medical professionals calm while coordinating care and making life-saving decisions is the norm for my profession,” she said. “Excelling at this makes a difference in my patients’ lives every day.”</p> <h3>Goal-setting</h3> <p>Working at a Level I trauma center, Ferri-Lewis understands the importance of knowing what needs to be accomplished and how it can be done in an intense and sometimes chaotic work environment.</p> <p>Setting lofty goals for herself in college and achieving them helps her continue to develop today in her career. “My professional goal is to keep up with new technologies and advancements in emergency medicine even after being in practice for 18 years now,” she said. “Recently, I added emergency department bedside ultrasound to my set of career skills to be able to better serve my patients.”</p> <p>Click <a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/stephanie-ferri-lewis-er-physician-credits-composure-being-three-sport-athlete">here</a> to read more about Ferri-Lewis’ life after college sports.</p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d3" class="tags__link">Division III</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/after-game" class="tags__link">After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-cross-country" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Cross Country</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-soccer" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Soccer</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-swimming-diving" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Swimming &amp; Diving</a></li></ul> Thu, 13 Jul 2017 20:21:10 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 20231 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/stephanie-ferri-lewis-3-attributes-learned-college-sports#comments Jeff Woods: 5 tips for a winning workforce transition http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/jeff-woods-5-tips-winning-workforce-transition <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img style="height: 100%; width: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/2017ATG_Woodsunbranded_20170614.jpg" width="1000" height="563" alt="" /></figure></p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <h5>Biography</h5> <p><strong>Jeffry C. Woods</strong><br /> Principal consultant and design specialist, Full Circle Consulting Systems, Inc.; adjunct professor, Indiana Wesleyan</p> <p><strong>Hometown:</strong> Kerhonson, New York</p> <p><strong>Current city:</strong> Indianapolis</p> <p><strong>School:</strong> Bachelor’s degree in corrective and adaptive physical education, <a href="https://www.uri.edu/">Rhode Island</a>, 1992; Master of Business Administration, Indiana Institute of Technology, 2002; doctor of education in organizational leadership, Argosy University, 2012.</p> <p><strong>Sport:</strong> Men’s track and field (long jump, 400-meter hurdles)</p> <p><strong>Interesting fact: </strong>Woods, a Rhode Island Athletic Hall of Fame inductee, set 20 school records in 10 different track and field events during his four years at the college. He went on to compete in the 1992 U.S. Track and Field Olympic Trials.</p> </div> <p>Jeff Woods knows what it takes to grow and develop champions in competition and in the workforce. Woods, a former University of Rhode Island track and field athlete, leveraged his college sports experiences to fuel a successful corporate and higher education career. Currently an educator and organizational effectiveness consultant in California and Indiana, Woods trains the next generation of leadership experts, builds high performing teams and regularly reflects on his time as a college athlete.</p> <p>Below, Woods offers his perspective on how student-athletes can apply lessons learned from competition for a smooth transition to the workforce.</p> <h3>Establish mutual trust.</h3> <p>As a student-athlete, coaches are trusting you to first perform in the classroom, then perform on the track. As an athlete, if you do not give 100 percent effort in practice, you will not give 100 percent effort during the game. This same mentality translates to the workforce.</p> <p>Be honest with others and yourself. Relationships need a solid foundation of trust to flourish. Develop the necessary habits to foster relationships with your supervisors and peers that are built on trust.</p> <p>I look to establish mutual trust in all my relationships — with my spouse, children, employer, friends. I learned that if people can’t trust you with the little things, they will not trust you with the bigger things.</p> <h3>Stay humble.</h3> <p>As a student-athlete, I learned there were many others who were counting on me to be successful. I quickly realized success was not just about me. To be successful in any job, you must make the transition from being selfish to being selfless. Think of yourself less and find innovative ways to contribute to the team’s success. And don’t forget to remain coachable.</p> <p>Being humble has allowed me to meet some great people and develop some long-lasting relationships. Transitioning from being selfish to selfless has provided me with much happiness, both personally and professionally.</p> <h3>Cultivate compassion.</h3> <p>My coach instilled in us compassion toward others. I was a very successful hurdler in college and it humbled me when my peers asked me which race I was doing, since they wanted to anticipate whether they had a chance at first place or not. During those moments, I learned to be compassionate in my response and say, “Every athlete has their day, and today just might be yours so don’t take it easy on me — make me work.”</p> <p>Never lose your ability to be kind to your peers, and they will most likely reciprocate with kindness, as well. Having a caring heart for others can add years to your life. I believe this is one of the best lessons that I have transferred down to my children.</p> <h3>Break out of your comfort zone.</h3> <p>At Rhode Island, I learned how to be courageous on and off the field. If I needed extra help with schoolwork, I had enough courage to ask for it. As an athlete, I developed the courage to embrace pain and continually push myself to get better. Have the courage to extend beyond your comfort zone. This is the only way you will grow.</p> <p>It is inevitable that life will throw some lemons at you. What I learned from my experience as a student-athlete was to embrace pain and adversity. As a college athlete and employee, I learned you automatically fail when you lack the courage to go beyond your comfort zone.</p> <h3>Remain disciplined.</h3> <p>A lack of discipline will lead to disappointment. Identify your goal and demonstrate the behaviors that will get you closer to your goal. Discipline will open doors of opportunity for you.</p> <p>My goal since I was in 8th grade was to make the ’92 U.S. Olympic track and field team. I knew without practicing like a champion every day, I would not have a chance. Early on, I focused on eating right and getting enough sleep - two habits that allowed me to perform at my best during practice and while competing.?</p> <p>I still practice self-control with the foods I eat which helps me remain healthy. I will run in in my 7th Marine Corp marathon this year and it is only because of the focus to take care of my body that I developed as a scholar athlete.</p> <p>If I did not develop discipline running track, I believe my life would be drastically different. It helped me go on to attend graduate school, complete my MBA, doctorate, and continues to help me remain physically fit.</p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d1" class="tags__link">Division I</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/mens-indoor-track-field" class="tags__link">Men&#039;s Indoor Track &amp; Field</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/mens-outdoor-track-field" class="tags__link">Men&#039;s Outdoor Track &amp; Field</a></li></ul> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 13:15:00 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 20006 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/jeff-woods-5-tips-winning-workforce-transition#comments After the Game Search http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/after-game-search <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="1400px" scrolling="no" src="https://ncaa.s3.amazonaws.com/files/communications/former-sa-search.html" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 04 Jan 2017 20:15:20 +0000 jjackson 21681 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/after-game-search#comments Chris Norton: Courage to push forward http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/chris-norton-courage-push-forward <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><script> <!--//--><![CDATA[// ><!-- var tag = document.createElement('script'); tag.src = "https://www.youtube.com/iframe_api"; var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag); var player; function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() {player = new YT.Player('ytplayer', {playerVars: { 'autoplay':0, 'controls':1, 'autohide':1, 'showinfo':0, 'modestbranding':1 }, events: {'onReady' : onPlayerReady}});}function onPlayerReady(event) {}function stopVideo() {player.stopVideo();} //--><!]]> </script><div style="position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top:30px; height: 0; margin:1.5em 0; overflow:hidden"><iframe allowfullscreen="1" frameborder="0" id="ytplayer" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UpnVQYNt4D0?enablejsapi=1&amp;origin=http://www.uqiqfo.live&amp;showinfo=0" style="position: absolute; height: 100%; width:100%; top: 0; left:0;" type="text/html"></iframe></div> <p>Former Luther College football player Christopher Norton experienced a life-changing injury Oct. 16, 2010. While making a tackle during kickoff at a game, Norton fractured his C3-C4 vertebrae, resulting in a 2 percent chance of regaining movement below the neck. The prognosis was grim.</p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <h5>Biography</h5> <p><strong>Name:</strong> Chris Norton</p> <p><strong>Hometown:</strong> Altoona, Iowa</p> <p><strong>Current residence:</strong> Port St. Lucie, Florida</p> <p><strong>School:</strong> Bachelor’s degree in management, <a href="http://www.luther.edu/">Luther College</a>, 2015</p> <p><strong>Sport:</strong> Football</p> <p><strong>Profession:</strong> Motivational speaker, author, founder of SCI CAN Foundation</p> <p><strong>Fun fact:</strong> As a guest on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” Norton danced with the TV show’s host.</p> </div> <p>Since the day of his injury during his freshman year at Luther, Norton has never missed a day of physical therapy. In 2015, he walked across the stage during Luther’s graduation ceremony and received an undergraduate degree in management. Norton continues to inspire millions worldwide by sharing his story of faith, determination and healing.</p> <p>Norton cites the NCAA’s catastrophic injury insurance program as instrumental in helping him and his family gain access to and partially fund his ongoing therapy. The program covers student-athletes who, like Norton, are catastrophically injured while participating in a covered intercollegiate athletic activity.?</p> <p>Realizing ongoing therapy is critical to recovery from various levels of neuromuscular deficiencies resulting from a spinal cord injury, Norton started the SCI CAN Foundation at age 20. The organization’s goal is simple: to provide equipment to therapy patients to help them achieve their goals.</p> <p>Through his journey and the impactful work of his foundation, Norton empowers others by reinforcing that they can do whatever they put their heart into.?</p> <p>”Courage is overcoming the odds, being able to not give into bad circumstances and to keep pushing forward,” Norton said.</p> <p>Norton received the 2011 CBS America’s Choice Honor for Courage in Sports, which pays tribute to the world’s greatest and most inspirational athletes, including Walter Payton and Muhammad Ali.</p> <p><a href="/champion/steps-forward">Click here</a> to read more about Norton’s inspirational story.</p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d3" class="tags__link">Division III</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/football" class="tags__link">Football</a></li></ul> Tue, 13 Dec 2016 16:29:21 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 18516 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/chris-norton-courage-push-forward#comments Kelley Gay: Strength through adaptability http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/kelley-gay-strength-through-adaptability <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p><figure class="media media-element-container media--view-mode--media_original"><img height="563" width="1000" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" class="media-element file-media-original" typeof="foaf:Image" src="/sites/default/files/ATG_kellyunbranded_20161201.jpg" alt="" /></figure></p> <p>The power of reflection, including an ability to critique herself and receive constructive criticism, is central to Kelley Gay’s desire to constantly expand and perfect her skills.</p> <p>As vice president of corporate marketing and communications, Gay oversees seven business units that support the delivery of OneAmerica’s brand management initiatives. Success in her role at the life insurance, retirement plan and employee benefits company based in Indianapolis requires her to strengthen the company’s culture and offer inspiration through storytelling. Each day, Gay draws upon childhood, collegiate experiences and on-the-job learning to develop herself as a person, professional communicator and corporate executive.</p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <h4>Biography</h4> <p><strong>Kelley (Hunt) Gay</strong><br /> Vice president of corporate marketing and communications at OneAmerica</p> <p><strong>Hometown: </strong>Londonderry, New Hampshire</p> <p><strong>Current residence: </strong>Zionsville, Indiana</p> <p><strong>School:</strong> Bachelor’s degree in English, <a href="http://uconn.edu/">University of Connecticut</a>, 1998</p> <p><strong>Sport:</strong> Women’s basketball</p> <p><strong>Fun fact:</strong> Gay is passionate about diversity and inclusion initiatives, especially those designed for students from preschool to high school. She supports and leads those programs when she can.</p> </div> <p>Raised in Londonderry, New Hampshire, with her twin sister, younger sister and parents, Kevin and Joan Hunt, Gay had a happy childhood. Her father, a retired NFL player, encouraged Gay to pursue athletics at a young age. Her mother drove home the belief that you can do anything you set your mind to.</p> <p>“I remember playing soccer and softball; my father instilled the value and benefit of being on a team,” Gay explained. “He wanted me to experience working with others to achieve a common goal and taught me teamwork requires humility.”</p> <p>After trying a variety of sports, Gay decided to focus on basketball. Through hard work and self-enforced practice, she became an up-and-coming star. During her final years of high school, Gay was recruited by numerous colleges and ultimately decided to attend the University of Connecticut and join its rising basketball team.</p> <p>“I knew I wanted to be close to home and part of something bigger than me,” Gay said. “And by bigger than me, I’m talking about making me a better person and athlete. I had a very narrow view on life and what was expected of me as a student-athlete. I knew UConn and their coaches would challenge me.”</p> <p>In 1995, Gay’s freshman year, the women’s basketball team, under coach Geno Auriemma, won its first national championship. And while Gay celebrated with her teammates and basked in their groundbreaking accomplishment, internally she was struggling to come to terms with her role on the team.</p> <p>“In high school, I was a 25-points-per-game player, but sitting center stage at UConn, I was on the second team,” Gay recalled. “My main job was to make the starters better, and I struggled with accepting that. My pride and my head got in the way.”</p> <p>Riding the bench tested Gay’s emotional strength and belief in her abilities. It was a physically and mentally taxing process, but over time Gay was able to find her feet and thrive in the supporting role that her coaches and team needed her to play.</p> <p>“Every single element of my game was broken down and reformatted. Trust in myself, teammates and coaches was a really important part of my journey,” Gay said. “I had to be resilient and really believe that the new me was the person UConn needed. I was determined to help this team and work for playing time.”</p> <p>Gay graduated from UConn in 1998 with a bachelor’s degree in English and began working as a communications specialist at Phoenix Life Insurance Co. Although Gay quickly learned that an office job working in a cubicle wasn’t necessarily suited for her energy level, she focused on how she could best benefit from this position to propel her career.</p> <p>After two years, Gay had learned to develop strong relationships and connect with colleagues. She realized that working hard didn’t mean one had to work 12-hour days. Instead, it meant working smart and focusing your efforts.</p> <p>“Being receptive to positive and constructive feedback was crucial,” Gay said. “I responded and thrived on how to improve my workplace performance, which mirrored when I was coached at Connecticut. From my playing days, I knew I respond better to before-the-game coaching versus after-the-game coaching.”</p> <p>Gay became a financial advisor for Smith Barney, now Morgan Stanley, in 2000. After two years, she joined MassMutual as a director of life product marketing, a position that broadened her business skills. Gay credits her career growth to having strong mentors who invested time into developing her. She remained at MassMutual until 2011, eventually becoming an assistant vice president.</p> <p>In her role today at OneAmerica, Gay regularly reflects on lessons she learned as a student-athlete to strengthen her relationships.</p> <p>“New Hampshire was pretty homogenous, and I did not experience a lot of diversity,” Gay said about her childhood. “At UConn and during the beginning of my career, I realized that different perspectives and backgrounds create deeper conversations and experiences. Working together creates better outcomes.”</p> <p>Gay believes that for organizations to thrive, employees must embrace adaptability — a trait she feels is undervalued in today’s workplace. Gay has learned change isn’t just required in today’s business world; it is an essential life skill. The ability to adapt is crucial for success.</p> <p>“It’s the combination of lessons learned on and off the court that turns you from a student-athlete to a corporate athlete,” Gay explained. “We have integrity, teamwork, a strong work ethic, competitiveness, authenticity and resiliency. Athletes, like corporate leaders, see the long game. They know that you might lose a game today, but you’re going to win the championship later.”</p> <p><em>Submitted photos by UConn Athletics, OneAmerica.</em></p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d1" class="tags__link">Division I</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-basketball" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Basketball</a></li></ul> Thu, 01 Dec 2016 14:13:04 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 18396 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/kelley-gay-strength-through-adaptability#comments Christina Drake: Lighting the way http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/christina-drake-lighting-way <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden component__content--wysiwyg"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><script> <!--//--><![CDATA[// ><!-- var tag = document.createElement('script'); tag.src = "https://www.youtube.com/iframe_api"; var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag); var player; function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() {player = new YT.Player('ytplayer', {playerVars: { 'autoplay':0, 'controls':1, 'autohide':1, 'showinfo':0, 'modestbranding':1 }, events: {'onReady' : onPlayerReady}});}function onPlayerReady(event) {}function stopVideo() {player.stopVideo();} //--><!]]> </script><div style="position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top:30px; height: 0; margin:1.5em 0; overflow:hidden"> <iframe id="ytplayer" type="text/html" style="position: absolute; height: 100%; width:100%; top: 0; left:0;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_GhySJ7fgEo?enablejsapi=1&amp;origin=http://www.uqiqfo.live&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="1"></iframe> </div> <p>Once a trailblazer for her family as well as the Fightin’ Engineers of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Christina Drake now is breaking down boundaries in the workforce.</p> <div class="inline-sidebar-right"> <h4>Biography</h4> <p><strong>Christina (Forsyth) Drake</strong><br /> Senior manager, process and performance, Midcontinent Independent System Operator</p> <p><strong>Hometown:</strong> Lyons, Indiana</p> <p><strong>Current residence:</strong> Indianapolis</p> <p><strong>School:</strong> Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, <a href="http://www.rose-hulman.edu/" target="_blank">Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology</a>, 2002</p> <p><strong>Sport: </strong>Women’s basketball</p> <p><strong>Fun fact: </strong>Drake is a car enthusiast. Soon after graduating from college, she purchased her first Ford Mustang and has owned several since.</p> </div> <p>The oldest child of five, Drake grew up in Lyons, a small town in southwest Indiana, in a tight-knit family. “We all played basketball,” said Drake, whose maiden name is Forsyth. Her dad meticulously cut and leveled a basketball floor under their hoop so the family could play the sport as often as they wanted. And they did.</p> <p>Drake played basketball throughout high school and expanded her extracurricular activities to include volleyball her senior year. But as her brothers and high school teammates challenged her on the court, her dad urged her to consider her options off the court. As Drake consistently recorded double-doubles in points and rebounds as a forward for her White River Valley High School team, it became clear that playing sports in college was a possibility.</p> <p>Drake also stood out in the classroom. Encouraged by her father to pursue an engineering career, she took notice of Rose-Hulman, one of the country’s top undergraduate engineering colleges, located in Terre Haute, Indiana. The previously all-male college had recently opened doors to its first four-year female class and had added a women’s basketball team. Drake saw Rose-Hulman as an opportunity to continue to play her family’s favorite sport while working to earn a degree in electrical engineering.</p> <p>In a school that still was populated by a male majority, attending as a female student-athlete was eye-opening at first.</p> <p>“The boys would come into the gymnasium after our practice sometimes, and it just seemed like there was an army of them, just hundreds and hundreds of these guys. There were at times maybe no more than 10 of us girls on the court,” Drake recalled.</p> <p>As the women’s team grew closer, Drake realized the unique role she could play in expanding the program and shaping future student-athlete experiences.</p> <p>“It was important to me to be a trailblazer with the women’s athletic programs,” Drake explained. “It was about much more than our team’s win-loss record, but about providing opportunities for those who would come after us. My teammates and I wanted to build a legacy for the women’s basketball program and to recruit others who had a passion for engineering but also loved competitive sports.”</p> <p>Drake was on the dean’s list her senior year and earned an academic honor roll award. She credits her success in the classroom to the time management skills and support system she gained as a student-athlete. The men’s and women’s basketball teams traveled together by bus, which often led to informal study sessions among the aspiring engineers and tutoring help from upperclassmen.</p> <p>Through sport, Drake also learned the values of perseverance and staying true to oneself.</p> <p>“Women’s basketball coach Brenda Goble always gave off an air of professionalism. She reminded us that it’s OK to be you and to be a self-confident woman,” Drake said. “Coach emphasized the need to give it your all and be fierce about it. She never let us give up, and I think that was important.”</p> <p>That drive propelled her to become the first in her immediate family to graduate with a four-year degree.</p> <p>After earning an electrical engineering bachelor’s degree in 2002, Drake joined the Midcontinent Independent System Operator in Carmel, Indiana – a nonprofit organization that operates the power grid and keeps electricity flowing – as an operations engineer.</p> <p>Her new employer, much like the engineering field as a whole, consisted mainly of male colleagues. According to U.S. Census data, women made up 9 percent of the electrical engineering workforce in 2014.</p> <p>“After being so close with my brothers, and then finding success at a school where nine out of 10 students were male, I felt right at home at MISO. I never doubted myself,” she said. “I just went in and did the best job that I could.”</p> <p>In 2006, Drake became the first woman in the company to hold the position of reliability coordinator. She was responsible for monitoring the system of electrical transmission and keeping the lights on for 42 million persons in 15 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba.</p> <p>“When there is an emergency on the electrical grid, the teams of engineers and operators come together so quickly. It reminds me a lot of my collegiate experience. People have your back, and they are there with you through thick and thin,” Drake said.</p> <p>Drake has advanced through the ranks at MISO, and in her current role she leads a team that improves processes to ensure smooth operations in the organization’s control room.</p> <p>Despite her individual successes, including a Rose-Hulman Athletic Hall of Fame induction in 2013, Drake applies the lessons of teamwork she learned as a Fightin’ Engineer to her work career.</p> <p>“I’ve been pretty successful in my career, but it’s great to do that with people and the connections that you make,” she noted. “I’m very results driven, but I’ve come to learn that results are built off the backs of people. If you want to do something great – do it with a team.”</p> </div></div></div><ul class="tags__listing"><li class="tags__item"><a href="/student-athletes/former-student-athlete" class="tags__link">Former Student-Athlete</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/d1" class="tags__link">Division I</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/themes-topics/life-after-game" class="tags__link">Life After the Game</a></li><li class="tags__item"><a href="/sports/womens-basketball" class="tags__link">Women&#039;s Basketball</a></li></ul> Thu, 17 Nov 2016 14:15:00 +0000 smeyers@ncaa.org 18261 at http://www.uqiqfo.live http://www.uqiqfo.live/student-athletes/former-student-athlete/christina-drake-lighting-way#comments 日升月恒试玩 20选5预测推荐 36走势图福建体彩 好运彩官网 捕鱼王下载 星悦浙江麻将二维码 十一选五开奖结果查询青海 广西快乐双彩投注技巧 老11选5规则老11选5? 酒类股票推荐股票 南宁麻将app 大发快三走势图怎么看 湖北30选5开奖结 日本女优与黑人 微信交流股票群 永利国际棋牌官网 体彩为什么卖不过福彩